Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

R-Postbit

Collapse

Late model diff's for early model trucks.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Late model diff's for early model trucks.

    Okay, so tech question. Has anyone looked into adapting a late model 14b or 10.5 inch rear end w/disc brakes onto a K5?

  • #2
    I looked into this briefly while I was building my chassis, not for the 14b or 10.5, but for the 1/2 ton axles. I ran into a lot of conflicting info. Not having access to one to measure and compare didn't help either. Since I already had two 12 bolts, I went ahead and used what I had and kept the drum brakes.

    Here's what I do know about axle swaps.
    • Spring perches and shock mounts are irrelevant.
    • They almost always have to be changed anyway to work for your setup.
    • The WMS measurement is not static when you are building your project.
    • The stock 10 bolt is narrower in the rear than the front and a lot of people use wheel spacers to correct. 1 1/2 - 2" wider is usually ok.
    • You will have metric studs rather than SAE. The 10.5" uses1350 U-joint.
    • You will have to fabricate brackets for your chassis to mount your E-brake cables.
    • You will need new cables fabricated to actuate the E-Brake.


    Comment


    • #3
      Not trying to thread jack, but want to point something out. There seems to be a lot of confusion on why the manufacturer would produce the rear axle with a narrower track than the front. Keep in mind these truck were built with compromises. By making the rear axle narrower than the front it allows the vehicle to turn more easily, less side load on the rear tires and a shorter turning radius. This may or may not be what you want on your own rig, but I wanted to point out the design theory for doing it that way. I personally would not recommend spacers, but would look for a wider axle if you want the front and rear to have the same track.
      1981 Blazer (before there were mini-blazers) in progress - Gen VI 454 TBI/TH400/NP241 Dana 60/14 Bolt

      When I die, I want to go out peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming my head off like the passengers in his car!

      If you are a "Supertramp", wouldn't you give more than a little bit?

      Comment


      • Sockalaminski
        Sockalaminski commented
        Editing a comment
        Good info, thanks Iggy.

      • Mutant
        Mutant commented
        Editing a comment
        I agree with Iggy on not using spacers.
        also, i always heard that the narrower rear axle helped in off road situations, to try to prevent following in the same ruts.
        i have no proof of this, but its what i was told when i was young and still have no reason to not believe it.

    • #4
      Great info. Some new. Some knew. Going to start a new thread because I am going to diverge from axles for now. Disc brakes.

      Comment


      • #5
        from what ive read on Pirate, there is a late model chevy van and truck that have disk brakes, that also have a small drum for the parking brake.
        i have no other info, as ive never read much, since i had already swapped to a 14bff.
        138Modified

        Comment


        • #6
          Originally posted by Iggy View Post
          Not trying to thread jack, but want to point something out. There seems to be a lot of confusion on why the manufacturer would produce the rear axle with a narrower track than the front. Keep in mind these truck were built with compromises. By making the rear axle narrower than the front it allows the vehicle to turn more easily, less side load on the rear tires and a shorter turning radius. This may or may not be what you want on your own rig, but I wanted to point out the design theory for doing it that way. I personally would not recommend spacers, but would look for a wider axle if you want the front and rear to have the same track.
          My gist on the tracking of the front and rear axles. What maybe great for the guy climbing rocks and running tight trails is not necessarily what the guy wheel'in in mud, sand, and snow wants. It's easier to follow your owns ruts. With the rear being 1.5" narrower on each side its more difficult for the rear tires to follow the front ruts. Because the tracks don't line up the tires are constantly fighting to track in one or the other ruts made by the front tires. It's all what you want or build your rig for. IMO, neither is right or wrong.

          Comment

          Working...
          X